A Simple* Number Theory Problem from the 2022 Indian National Math Olympiad (INMO)

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I teach high school mathematics in Melbourne, Australia. I like thinking about interesting problems and learning new things.

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Russell Lim

Russell Lim

I teach high school mathematics in Melbourne, Australia. I like thinking about interesting problems and learning new things.

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